Every November 11th, the Chinese giant slashes prices on its online B2C and C2C platforms: respectively Tmall and Taobao. This year, the Chinese have spent 120.7 billion yuan (US$17.79 billion) in gross merchandise volume (GMV), exceeding 2015’s record by about 32 percent, and representating more than Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.
Alibaba’s 11.11 is by far the biggest online shopping day of the year in the world. Every November 11th, the Chinese giant slashes prices on its online B2C and C2C platforms: respectively Tmall and Taobao. This year, the Chinese have spent 120.7 billion yuan (US$17.79 billion) in gross merchandise volume (GMV), exceeding 2015’s record by about 32 percent, and representating more than Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.   1) From “singles day” to “shopping day” Double 11 used to be considered by Chinese students as the singles day. As everything in China represents an opportunity to do business, Alibaba had the brilliant idea, back in 2009, to turn 11.11 into an excuse to go shopping. From that moment on, the company's sales have skyrocketed. 2) All lights on! Alibaba Global Shopping Festival Gala Celebration is among the biggest retail ecommerce events in the world, generating interest and catching the eye of the most popular media platforms. This large-scale event is happening during double 11’s kickoff day with a focus on entertainment and interactive engagement. Alibaba introduced a wide range of multimedia activities, including a virtual reality shopping experience and a fashion show (see below). The company also leveraged famous Key Opinion Leaders (KOL): sport stars, musicians and actors such as Kobe Bryant, David Beckham, OneRepublic or Scarlett Johansson to help merchants increase their brands and products awareness. Alibaba ensured that their shopping festival show was broadcast across all existing devices (e.g. TV, computer, tablet and mobile phone) to target the largest possible audience. There was even a shopping entertainment show where they live streamed a fashion show during which viewers could preorder clothes on the website as models walked down the runway. According to the director of the gala, 35 million people tuned in for this! 3) One of the biggest multi-brands platforms in the world Alibaba offers one of the widest choice with more than 11 000 international brands from more than 200 countries. This includes brands such as Maserati, Remowa, Guerlain and Burberry who are all hoping to take a slice out of the Chinese consumer market. During 11.11, 37% of the sales were from international brands or vendors. Japan, US and South Korea are leading the ranking with Uniqlo, Apple, Nike, Siemens. (Source: Alizila) 4) The unique day for global sales in China Unlike in the West, China does not restrict periods of sales, brands are free to define their own, and people to track these periods. Double 11 became the first global sales event to take place in the lands of the Middle Kingdom. That is the only moment where everyone can expect his/her favorite brand to offer promotions. 5) Digital pioneer During the festival, Alibaba had plans to reinvent the way consumers buy goods. For example, the launch of the first virtual reality shopping experience! With a cardboard VR headset and a smartphone, shoppers could browse eight digital international stores to assess goods before buying them. And in just a few seconds, anyone could visit Macy’s New York famous department store from their home. Alibaba has leveraged other technical innovations to fight against counterfeit items sold on its marketplaces, such as the IP Joint-force Sytem: an online system aiming at controlling the sales of fake products. Here, the commerce firms and brands will work together to report suspicious activities through an online portal to track and remove counterfeit products. What shall we conclude? The “singles day” festival clearly gives us an insight about how tomorrow’s retail might look. For both buyers and sellers, 11.11 has become a key date on the Chinese calendar. More specifically for brands, it’s a great way to take advantage of consumer’s attention to transform 11.11 into a living laboratory for retail and marketing innovations, with new products and new ways to engage with customers, online and offline.
Every November 11th, the Chinese giant slashes prices on its online B2C and C2C platforms: respectively Tmall and Taobao. This year, the Chinese have spent 120.7 billion yuan (US$17.79 billion) in gross merchandise volume (GMV), exceeding 2015’s record by about 32 percent, and representating more than Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.
Alibaba’s 11.11 is by far the biggest online shopping day of the year in the world. Every November 11th, the Chinese giant slashes prices on its online B2C and C2C platforms: respectively Tmall and Taobao. This year, the Chinese have spent 120.7 billion yuan (US$17.79 billion) in gross merchandise volume (GMV), exceeding 2015’s record by about 32 percent, and representating more than Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.   1) From “singles day” to “shopping day” Double 11 used to be considered by Chinese students as the singles day. As everything in China represents an opportunity to do business, Alibaba had the brilliant idea, back in 2009, to turn 11.11 into an excuse to go shopping. From that moment on, the company's sales have skyrocketed. 2) All lights on! Alibaba Global Shopping Festival Gala Celebration is among the biggest retail ecommerce events in the world, generating interest and catching the eye of the most popular media platforms. This large-scale event is happening during double 11’s kickoff day with a focus on entertainment and interactive engagement. Alibaba introduced a wide range of multimedia activities, including a virtual reality shopping experience and a fashion show (see below). The company also leveraged famous Key Opinion Leaders (KOL): sport stars, musicians and actors such as Kobe Bryant, David Beckham, OneRepublic or Scarlett Johansson to help merchants increase their brands and products awareness. Alibaba ensured that their shopping festival show was broadcast across all existing devices (e.g. TV, computer, tablet and mobile phone) to target the largest possible audience. There was even a shopping entertainment show where they live streamed a fashion show during which viewers could preorder clothes on the website as models walked down the runway. According to the director of the gala, 35 million people tuned in for this! 3) One of the biggest multi-brands platforms in the world Alibaba offers one of the widest choice with more than 11 000 international brands from more than 200 countries. This includes brands such as Maserati, Remowa, Guerlain and Burberry who are all hoping to take a slice out of the Chinese consumer market. During 11.11, 37% of the sales were from international brands or vendors. Japan, US and South Korea are leading the ranking with Uniqlo, Apple, Nike, Siemens. (Source: Alizila) 4) The unique day for global sales in China Unlike in the West, China does not restrict periods of sales, brands are free to define their own, and people to track these periods. Double 11 became the first global sales event to take place in the lands of the Middle Kingdom. That is the only moment where everyone can expect his/her favorite brand to offer promotions. 5) Digital pioneer During the festival, Alibaba had plans to reinvent the way consumers buy goods. For example, the launch of the first virtual reality shopping experience! With a cardboard VR headset and a smartphone, shoppers could browse eight digital international stores to assess goods before buying them. And in just a few seconds, anyone could visit Macy’s New York famous department store from their home. Alibaba has leveraged other technical innovations to fight against counterfeit items sold on its marketplaces, such as the IP Joint-force Sytem: an online system aiming at controlling the sales of fake products. Here, the commerce firms and brands will work together to report suspicious activities through an online portal to track and remove counterfeit products. What shall we conclude? The “singles day” festival clearly gives us an insight about how tomorrow’s retail might look. For both buyers and sellers, 11.11 has become a key date on the Chinese calendar. More specifically for brands, it’s a great way to take advantage of consumer’s attention to transform 11.11 into a living laboratory for retail and marketing innovations, with new products and new ways to engage with customers, online and offline.
IKEA: A Chinese Success Story... IKEA is one of these western brands that have successfully broke in the Chinese market. Since 1998, the most famous Swedish ready-to-assemble furniture firm has been surfing on the rapid and strong improvement of local living conditions which have led the Chinese to invest more in home decoration.
IKEA: A Chinese Success Story... IKEA is one of these western brands that have successfully broke in the Chinese market. Since 1998, the most famous Swedish ready-to-assemble furniture firm has been surfing on the rapid and strong improvement of local living conditions which have led the Chinese to invest more in home decoration. Its numbers are impressive: 12 billion CNY in sales within the last 9 months, 20% of growth YoY, 3 new stores opening per year in average.   …Late on the digitalization of its sales strategy And yet, until now, IKEA had not set up any e-commerce platform to support its sales performance, in a country where more than 80% of 1st tier cities citizens are used to buying online. Things are nevertheless changing as the furniture retail giant has recently decided to join the bandwagon of offering online shops, literally adding the bricks and clicks as part of their global China sales strategy. All products, except food and green plants, will be available online. The company is making its first attempt in Shanghai, which will serve as a test for the entire APAC region.  IKEA has already launched it in Europe, where sales exceeded one billion euros this year. The launch of its e-commerce should particularly help attract new customers who don’t have yet access to physical stores (third and fourth-tier cities). Implementing a omnichannel strategy will also strengthened IKEA's position in China.   What’s next? Going on marketplaces? In a country where brands struggle to make online business on their own platform, notably due to the outstanding performance of marketplaces, it would certainly sound relevant from a digital marketing & sales point of view for IKEA to complete its online presence by establishing a store on a site like Tmall as well. Will this be IKEA’s next move?  
IKEA: A Chinese Success Story... IKEA is one of these western brands that have successfully broke in the Chinese market. Since 1998, the most famous Swedish ready-to-assemble furniture firm has been surfing on the rapid and strong improvement of local living conditions which have led the Chinese to invest more in home decoration.
IKEA: A Chinese Success Story... IKEA is one of these western brands that have successfully broke in the Chinese market. Since 1998, the most famous Swedish ready-to-assemble furniture firm has been surfing on the rapid and strong improvement of local living conditions which have led the Chinese to invest more in home decoration. Its numbers are impressive: 12 billion CNY in sales within the last 9 months, 20% of growth YoY, 3 new stores opening per year in average.   …Late on the digitalization of its sales strategy And yet, until now, IKEA had not set up any e-commerce platform to support its sales performance, in a country where more than 80% of 1st tier cities citizens are used to buying online. Things are nevertheless changing as the furniture retail giant has recently decided to join the bandwagon of offering online shops, literally adding the bricks and clicks as part of their global China sales strategy. All products, except food and green plants, will be available online. The company is making its first attempt in Shanghai, which will serve as a test for the entire APAC region.  IKEA has already launched it in Europe, where sales exceeded one billion euros this year. The launch of its e-commerce should particularly help attract new customers who don’t have yet access to physical stores (third and fourth-tier cities). Implementing a omnichannel strategy will also strengthened IKEA's position in China.   What’s next? Going on marketplaces? In a country where brands struggle to make online business on their own platform, notably due to the outstanding performance of marketplaces, it would certainly sound relevant from a digital marketing & sales point of view for IKEA to complete its online presence by establishing a store on a site like Tmall as well. Will this be IKEA’s next move?