Since August of this year, Dior has made it possible in China by becoming the first luxury brand to sell handbags on… WeChat! Dior has indeed opened a Wechat store on the 1st of August through which users can buy limited edition handbags (« Lady Dior China Small Valentine »). The idea for Dior was to take advantage of the 9th of August - Chinese Valentine's Day - to trigger sales.
Since August of this year, Dior has made it possible in China by becoming the first luxury brand to sell handbags on… WeChat! Dior has indeed opened a Wechat store on the 1st of August through which users can buy limited edition handbags (« Lady Dior China Small Valentine »). The idea for Dior was to take advantage of the 9th of August - Chinese Valentine's Day - to trigger sales. Despite a significant price of 28,000 CNY (3,800€), 200 handbags have been sold within a day, creating a huge buzz in the industry. Such a move may seem surprising considering how reluctant top luxury brands used to be when it comes to using online channels - as they were trying to preserve a unique shopping experience. However, times change, and the opportunities that the current China mobile market dynamism brings have very likely been quite convincing: by mid-2016, around 710 million Chinese Internet users access to the web via their smartphone (98% of the entire chinese Internet users); Around 70% of Taobao and Jindong’s turnover come from mobile transactions. The enthusiasm for WeChat - whose total number of active users reached 800 million in June 2016 - and the attraction of millennials for luxury goods, are leading marketing experts to recommend luxury brands to explore non-traditional channels. In 2014, Burberry had already opened an online store on Tmall in order to fight against the rise of fake products on the platform. During this time, imitation and fake products remain an important issue in China. As a result, it is now time for luxury brands to go beyond what they used to hold as branding principles and jump onto the digital bandwagon before it’s too late.
Since August of this year, Dior has made it possible in China by becoming the first luxury brand to sell handbags on… WeChat! Dior has indeed opened a Wechat store on the 1st of August through which users can buy limited edition handbags (« Lady Dior China Small Valentine »). The idea for Dior was to take advantage of the 9th of August - Chinese Valentine's Day - to trigger sales.
Since August of this year, Dior has made it possible in China by becoming the first luxury brand to sell handbags on… WeChat! Dior has indeed opened a Wechat store on the 1st of August through which users can buy limited edition handbags (« Lady Dior China Small Valentine »). The idea for Dior was to take advantage of the 9th of August - Chinese Valentine's Day - to trigger sales. Despite a significant price of 28,000 CNY (3,800€), 200 handbags have been sold within a day, creating a huge buzz in the industry. Such a move may seem surprising considering how reluctant top luxury brands used to be when it comes to using online channels - as they were trying to preserve a unique shopping experience. However, times change, and the opportunities that the current China mobile market dynamism brings have very likely been quite convincing: by mid-2016, around 710 million Chinese Internet users access to the web via their smartphone (98% of the entire chinese Internet users); Around 70% of Taobao and Jindong’s turnover come from mobile transactions. The enthusiasm for WeChat - whose total number of active users reached 800 million in June 2016 - and the attraction of millennials for luxury goods, are leading marketing experts to recommend luxury brands to explore non-traditional channels. In 2014, Burberry had already opened an online store on Tmall in order to fight against the rise of fake products on the platform. During this time, imitation and fake products remain an important issue in China. As a result, it is now time for luxury brands to go beyond what they used to hold as branding principles and jump onto the digital bandwagon before it’s too late.